Proposals: PKAL-Ohio Spring 2017 Conference

2017 Ohio-PKAL Annual Conference
May 20, 2017 | University of Findlay

Deadline for proposal submission: December 16, 2017

Ohio - Project Kaleidoscope (OH-PKAL) will hold its 2017 Ohio PKAL conference at the University of Findlay in Findlay, Ohio on May 20, 2017.  This year’s conference is entitled, Evidence-Based STEM Education: Teaching and Student Success.  

Proposals are invited and encouraged to showcase evidence-based practices that reflect any of the themes below, and that are poised for immediate uptake and adaptation in a wide range of institution types, including community colleges and minority serving institutions. Of particular interest are proposals that effectively integrate two or more of the conference themes. It is also expected that presenters be available at the time they are scheduled by the conference organizers.

Conference Themes

The specific themes to be addressed with this Call for Proposals are the following:

  • Teaching STEM Service Courses to Non-majors
  • Integration of Effective Mathematics Teaching across the STEM Curriculum
  • Promoting Effective Learning Across Teaching Environments (e.g., lecture, lab, field, community, online)
  • Increasing Retention and Graduation Rates of Underprepared STEM Students
  • Contribute-a-Theme (see below for more details)

Theme I: Teaching STEM Service Courses to Non-majors

This theme focuses on sessions and presentations that provide faculty with knowledge, materials, and strategies for teaching non-majors to recognize the difference between true scientific knowledge and junk science, addressing common misconceptions, and providing evidence of increased scientific literacy. Special emphasis is placed on initiatives that are readily transferable across various institutional types. Proposals that describe the impact of strategies from any STEM discipline (including the social sciences) using valid quantitative, qualitative and/or mixed research methods are highly encouraged.

Examples of activities might include:

  • having students interview scientists and graduate students in science;
  • activities that demonstrate how to recognize junk science or science based on limited data;
  • community engagement projects that demonstrate how science benefits society; and/or
  • the development of service courses that move non-major students from high school-level science to science appropriate for college-level learning outcomes.

Theme II: Integration of Effective Mathematics Teaching across the STEM Curriculum

This theme focuses on sessions and presentations that provide faculty with knowledge, materials, and strategies for effective mathematics application and learning in STEM courses with a focus on student learning outcomes and assessment practices. Special emphasis is placed on initiatives that are readily transferable across various institutional types. Proposals that describe the impact of student learning outcomes and assessments from any STEM discipline (including the social sciences) using valid quantitative, qualitative and/or mixed research methods are highly encouraged.

Examples of practices might include:

  • helping students develop metacognition by demonstrating the link between student learning outcomes and classroom activities;
  • assessment data demonstrating improved student learning and engagement; and/or
  • providing reliable and valid assessment tools, particularly for hard-to-measure learning outcomes at the course or department level.

Theme III: Promoting Effective Learning Across Teaching Environments

Promoting effective learning across learning environments focuses on sessions and presentations that provide faculty with knowledge, materials, and strategies to enhance learning and engagement in large lecture classes, laboratories, the field, the community, online, etc. Special emphasis is placed on initiatives that are anchored in data and readily transferable across various institutional types. Proposals representing research and/or practices from any STEM discipline (including the social sciences) that describe the impact of these activities using valid quantitative, qualitative and/or mixed research methods are highly encouraged.

Examples of activities might include:

  • evidence from gains in conceptual understanding or attitude changes resulting from active learning strategies;
  • the creative and effective use of technology innovations to draw students into course content; and/or
  • ways to structure class sessions to promote critical thinking and engagement and provide evidence for their success.

Theme IV: Increasing Retention and Graduation Rates of Underprepared STEM Students

This theme includes presentations and sessions that highlight evidence-driven models and innovations directed toward the recruitment, retention, persistence, and graduation rates of underprepared students in the STEM disciplines. Special emphasis is placed on initiatives that are readily transferable across various institutional types. Proposals representing research and/or practices from any STEM discipline (including the social sciences) that include and apply valid quantitative, qualitative, and/or mixed research methods collecting evidence to improve the design, implementation, study, and assessment of underprepared STEM student success are highly encouraged.

Examples of activities might include:

  • data about the underlying issues affecting the differential participation and graduation rates in STEM undergraduate education for underprepared students;
  • evidence of innovative strategies for enhancing STEM education, pedagogy, and STEM persistence among underprepared STEM students; and/or
  • institutional collaborative models that have significant impact on increasing underprepared STEM student success.

Contribute-a-Theme  

This themed session provides conference attendees the opportunity to showcase a particular topic of their choice that fits under the broader conference theme.  Contributed themed sessions enable a narrow topic to be presented in a single parallel session that often targets a specific audience.  For those interested in contributing a themed session, they are responsible for providing a title for the session and must solicit proposals from 3-4 presenters that indicate their interest in being part of the themed session.  All proposals will be submitted separately but must include the same proposed contributed theme session title so they are linked during the review process.  If conference organizers do not believe the contributed theme warrants its own parallel session, the proposed presentations may, where appropriate, be placed under one of the four existing conference theme sessions.  As with all contributed proposals, presentations that describe the impact of student learning outcomes and assessments from any STEM discipline (including the social sciences) using valid quantitative, qualitative and/or mixed research methods are highly encouraged.

Examples of themed sessions might include:

  • a set of related presentations from multiple institutions regarding the evidence-based successes, as well as the related challenges, of using active learning in first year calculus classes and/or
  • a set of related presentations from multiple research groups about the use of a specific data collection tool in various contexts.

Session Formats

Poster (60 minutes; 4’x3’ poster)

Posters share visual models of research findings; course, program, curricular/co-curricular designs; concept maps; assessment rubrics and feedback loops; strategic planning frameworks and high-impact practices. The poster session provides an opportunity to reach a broad audience and initiate conversations with colleagues with similar interests. Posters are displayed on a 4’x3’ poster board.

Oral Presentation (15 minute presentations [12 minutes to speak, 3 minutes for questions]; computers and video projectors are standard in the presentation rooms)

Oral sessions share current work—in research, theory, or practice—related to the conference domains. They engage participants in considering how to use this framework to promote student success. Proposals should explicitly connect to a particular theme and use any of the guiding examples. Presenters should provide data/findings related to the topic, effective practices, milestones for success, and strategies for change, and engage participants. Please, note that the session should be an analysis of effective frameworks, theories, and practices that are adaptable to others – not a show-n-tell of what you did.

Roundtable Discussions – Shared Interest Groups (60 minutes; room set in roundtables, no audio visual)

Facilitated discussions provide time for colleagues to more deeply examine topics of similar interest through iterative sharing of expertise and experiences. The facilitators briefly set the context for the conversation related to one of the conference domains. Contexts may reflect institutional type, position, or a particular area of practice. For example the discussion topic, i.e., inclusive excellence in STEM higher education might be more narrowly focused on specific sets of strategies in 2-year colleges, faculty perception, or disciplinary/integrative approaches. Facilitators assist the group in examining new ways of thinking about the topic drawing on experience of what works and does not work and then discuss strategies for moving forward given the complications of each individual’s professional reality and expertise in the room. This session should allow for questions from all participants to stimulate and focus the conversation so that the issues discussed are meaningful to all involved and potentially lead to cross-disciplinary and/or inter-institutional collaboration. These discussions will occur during lunch.

Developing and Submitting a Proposal

Proposals are accepted through an online form and must include:

  • Name, title, institution, and email address of each presenter with indication of primary person of contact
  • Session theme
  • Presentation format (please rank format preference from most preferred to least or no preference)
  • Session title (100 character limit including spaces)
  • Brief abstract to be used in the conference program if accepted (150 word limit)
  • Statement of intended audience (100 word limit)
  • Participant outcomes (100 word limit)
  • Description of evidence indicating that the method, activity, or pedagogy was effective (150 word limit)

Proposal Review Criteria

Ohio PKAL strives to offer a balanced, informative and thought provoking conference that best fits within the framework of increasing STEM student success, which also empowers and emboldens STEM academicians to dramatically impact the quality of STEM education in Ohio. The conference proposal selection committee includes experienced, diverse academic STEM professionals. In evaluating conference proposals, reviewers are asked to consider both the technical aspects of the proposal and the way in which the presentation/session contributes to increasing STEM student success. The following elements are considered in the review of conference proposals:

  • the potential for the proposed session/presentation to advance knowledge and understanding of STEM undergraduate education;
  • the extent to which the session/presentation offers creative, novel and transformative evidence-based mechanisms for enhancing STEM learning, particularly for diverse audiences;
  • the extent to which the proposed session/presentation effectively incorporates two or more of the conference themes; and
  • the ease by which conference session/presentation materials and outcomes can be adapted to a wide range of institution types.

Additional Information

The deadline for proposal submission is December 16, 2016. Upon submission of a proposal, the primary contact should receive an automatic message indicating that OH-PKAL has received the proposal. If the primary contact does not receive this message (and it is not in his/her spam filter), please e-mail OH-PKAL@aacu.org.

Notifications

The primary contact may receive a request from the proposal review committee asking for a change from most preferred mode of presentation. This request would be made depending on the scoring of proposals and/or the number of proposals listing the same preferred mode of presentation. Acceptance notification via email for the submitted proposal will occur on or before January 15, 2017.

Expenses and Fees

All session facilitators are responsible for conference registration fees, travel, and hotel expenses. Please, be sure that all individuals listed in the proposal have this information and can be available to present throughout the event. Presentation times range from 9:00 am – 5:00 pm, May 20, 2017 at the University of Findlay in Findlay, Ohio.