Liberal Education, Winter 2002

Current Issue

Winter2002Vol.88No.1

Vital Signs: Voices from the Field

Education creates an educated citizenry capable of the leadership essential to democracy. Liberal education, by questioning, exploring, and challenging, is needed in the present environment in order to sustain democracy.

 

Table of Contents
President's Message
From 1818 R Street NW

By Bridget Puzon

Featured Topic

By Mary Marcy
Education creates an educated citizenry capable of the leadership essential to democracy. Liberal education, by questioning, exploring, and challenging, is needed in the present environment in order to sustain democracy.

By Thomas Cottle
John Dewey developed ideas regarding reflective thinking and the challenges to it that are relevant to our times. Education is intended to provide a repertoire of intellectual activities for systematic and disciplined thinking that can counteract assaults on reason.

By Marsha Guenzler-Stevens
At the University of Maryland the potentially disruptive events of September 11 had the effect of uniting diverse groups. The spontaneous as well as the planned activities forged a community with a common ethos and purpose.

By Michael Jackson
The varied resources represented by people who make a university function, from security staff to presidential leadership and all those in between, were called upon to respond to the potential threats to the university's core mission posed by terrorist acts. A glimpse of how that worked.

Perspectives

By Richard Keeling
Leadership in working out the potential benefits of the Program for Health and Higher Education led to the creation of a learning community around public health issues relevant to students. The program expanded into outreach to local high schools in order to engage students in learning about these issues and what they could contribute to solving them.

By Robert Holyer
Student learning is strongly influenced by interaction with faculty. John Henry Newman's experience of intellectual community in the faculty common room serves as a model for faculty renewal. Any revision of the general education curriculum necessarily calls for the renewal of faculty culture to ensure its vitality and success.

By Peter Stearns
General education requires continuous attentiveness by all those involved in its design and implementation. In general education courses, students get their first experience of the vitality of college-level learning. The issues involved in the framework of effective general education include such things as program design, size and scope, governance and faculty engagement.

By Alison Cook-Sather, Katherine Rowe, and Elliott Shore
An interdisciplinary course explores the various biases that are woven into human lives and seen in texts. Students express how they learn to recognize and follow the biases from which people write, and in the process, they comprehend a wide range of experience.

My View

By Beverly Kahn
Translation of the values and goals of liberal arts education into terms relevant to career-oriented students is a task worth developing. The quality of their education requires their having learning experiences that broaden and deepen their intellectual capacities.

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