Liberal Education, Fall 2002

Current Issue

Fall2002Vol.88No.4

Civic Engagement

Presidential leaders have the opportunity to contribute the resources of their institutions to public service. The universities they lead should be models in confronting the problems of a complex society and contributing to their solution.

Table of Contents
President's Message
From 1818 R Street NW

By Bridget Puzon

Featured Topic

By Robert A. Corrigan
Presidential leaders have the opportunity to contribute the resources of their institutions to public service. The universities they lead should be models in confronting the problems of a complex society and contributing to their solution.

By K. Edward Spiezio
Educators can play a leading role in promoting civic engagement through curricular and institutional innovations by which students encounter the theory and practice of participatory democracy. Models provide assistance in the effort.

By Wm. David Burns
Students' intellectual engagement can be achieved by teaching through the subject of study to social issues relevant to their interests. The process of designing such curricula reveals the potential for enlarging students'civic capacities.

By Nancy Thomas
The quest for a liberal education that fits contemporary students leads to reflections on the intellectual and moral capacities needed for responsible citizenship.                              

Greater Expectations

By Ronald Williams, Vera Zdravkovich, and Isa Egleberg
If the practical arts are the motive force behind community colleges, how are the liberal arts integrated into them?

Perspectives

By Paul B. Armstrong
While honoring the Emersonian ideal of individual self-realization, Brown's curriculum addresses the challenges of cultural difference. Interdisciplinary exploration and undergraduate research are key components of its distinctive curriculum.

By Paul Hamill
Faculty create digitally rich courses in the humanities include opportunities for collaborative learning that are more effective than traditional approaches.. The development of these courses is time-consuming and, as a realistic account of what is involved reveals, complex to sustain. At the same time, equally real are the advantages for student learning.

My View

By Robert H. Bell
From a professor's earliest days in the classroom through the course of a career, teaching is demanding, challenging, and most of all, a joy. Through the study of writing and literature, the teacher shows the pleasure derived from generous attention to literary texts.

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