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Campus Women Lead

Fall 2002

Volume 32
Number 1

30 Years of Title IX



Director's Outlook



From Where I Sit



Featured Topic



In Brief



National Initiative



Global Perspective



Data Connection



Links



Opportunities



For Your Bookshelf



Data Connection
Miles to go before we sleep. . .

Just twenty-one percent of all full professors at colleges and universities are women and just over two percent are women of color, despite the fact that fifty-six percent of undergraduate students are female.

Women receive only twenty percent of computer science and engineering-related technology bachelor's degrees.

The lower tests scores of African American females, Native American females, and Latinas compared to their white and Asian peers remains a serious and deep educational divide.

Driven by lawsuits and referendums, some educational institutions are moving to dismantle affirmative action programs that have increased access for women and students of color.

Low-income women have lost an avenue to higher education under the new welfare law.

Sexual harassment remains pervasive in public schools, where eighty-one percent of students surveyed have experienced it.

The vocational education law no longer requires targeted support for programs that have helped women gain access to and succeed in nontraditional occupations.

Although teenage girls use computers and the Internet at rates similar to their male peers, girls are five times less likely to consider a technology-related career path or plan on taking post secondary technology classes. According to a 1996 study of SAT test takers, female students are less likely to have experience using computers to solve math problems but more likely to have used a computer for word processing, a skill that will not lead to high-paying, high-tech jobs.

Students and colleagues evaluate female faculty more harshly than male faculty.

For every new dollar going into athletics at the Division I and II levels, male sports receive sixty-five cents while female sports receive thirty-five cents.

Percentage of Degrees Awarded to Women


Degree

1971-72

1997-98

Associate of Arts

45

61

Bachelor of Arts

44

56

Master of Arts

41

57

Doctorate

16

42




Percentage of Women Teaching in Higher Education


Status

1970

1998-99

Full Professors

8.7

20.8

Associate Professors

15.1

35.8

Assistant Professors

19.4

45.0

Instructors

32.5

50.6


This data was taken from Title IX at 30, Report Card on Gender Equity, a Report of the National Coalition for Women and Girls in Education (NCWGE) that was published in June 2002. The NCWGE is a nonprofit organization that was established in 1975 and is now composed of about 50 diverse organizations, including the Association of American Colleges & Universities, that are committed to improving education opportunities for girls and women. The report can be accessed at www.ncwge.org and you may order copies of the report by calling 202-785-7793.



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