Liberal Education: Summer 2002

Current Issue

Summer2002Vol.88No.3

Changing Course: Preparing Faculty for the Future

A review of recent studies regarding new faculty and of graduate students aspiring to a faculty career documents the deficiencies in graduate education and the need for better bridges between doctoral preparation and the actual work of faculty.

Table of Contents
President's Message

By Carol Geary Schneider

From 1818 R Street NW

By Bridget Puzon

Featured Topic

By Jerry Gaff
A review of recent studies regarding new faculty and of graduate students aspiring to a faculty career documents the deficiencies in graduate education and the need for better bridges between doctoral preparation and the actual work of faculty.

By Ann Ferren, Jerry Gaff, and Alma Clayton-Pedersen
Observers of PFF programs reviewed selected campuses to discover the results of nearly ten years of participation. Significant factors in the programs and strategies for sustaining their momentum provide insight into current practices in graduate education and what future faculty need.

By Jack Meacham
Does graduate education adequately prepare doctoral students for the varied responsibilities of the professoriate they plan to enter? What role could other kinds of institutions play in the education of graduate students for the professoriate?

By Paul D. Nelson and Sherwyn P. Morreale
National disciplinary associations through their varied array of resources demonstrate how they can support the preparation of future faculty as a natural part of graduate department responsibilities.

Greater Expectations: The Commitment to Quality as a Nation Goes to College

By Nancy Van Note Chism, N. Douglas Lees, and Scott Evenbeck
Effective faculty development is intensified when the work of teaching change takes place in communities of practice. A model of the process of faculty development for innovative teaching shows how it became institutionalized.

Perspectives

By Linda McMillin
What are the factors that reinforce the division between faculty and administrators? Are there processes that minimize the divide? Lessons learned about collaboration convey its complexity and potential for producing results that benefit participants and institutions.

By Eugenia P. Gerdes
Beyond administrators' serving as advocates for liberal education and providing appropriate resources, charging a faculty group to transcend disciplinary perspectives and assume responsibility for general education is essential to protecting students' broader educational interests.

My View

By Charles Bashara
What do graduate students say about their experience of PFF? How do they face the challenges of seeking faculty appointments? And how do they regard PFF's relevance to their first years in the professoriate?

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