Liberal Education, Fall 2001

Current Issue

Fall2001Vol.87No.4

Religion on Campus

A qualitative analysis of religion on campus challenges prevailing assumptions about undergraduate interest in the practices, attitudes, and study of religion in contemporary colleges and universities.

Table of Contents

The AAC&U Board of Directors and Staff share with all Americans an overwhelming grief and sadness at the horrific acts of carnage the nation has endured. We extend our deepest sympathies to all those affected by this national tragedy and we share in the resolve to bring those responsible to justice.

President's Message

By Carol Geary Schneider

FROM 1818 R STREET NW

By Bridget Puzon

Featured Topic

By Conrad Cherry, Betty A. DeBerg, and Amanda Porterfield
A qualitative analysis of religion on campus challenges prevailing assumptions about undergraduate interest in the practices, attitudes, and study of religion in contemporary colleges and universities.

By Robert Eisen
The study of Jewish religion is one component of Jewish studies. An exploration of how Jewish religion is taught and students' multiple motivations and responses to the academic study of Judaism reveals its value in their undergraduate education.

By Paul Dovre
Scholars from a spectrum of religious denominations discuss the mission and identity of religiously affiliated institutions and their future in the universe of American higher education.

By Robert Kiely
The study of religion at Harvard has grown since its inception as a major field of study. It reflects the varieties of religious traditions represented in the student body and the openness that characterizes religious expression.

By Arthur Schwartz
What is spirituality? What are the premises upon which it is built? Addressing these questions raised by students in their spiritual quest provides insight into the meaning of spirituality.

By Kathleen Mahoney, John Schmalzbauer, and James Youniss
An overview of the role of religion in the academy surveys recent developments and challenges in its resurgence in the twenty-first century.

Perspectives

By Michael J. Strada
The importance of faculty-supported learning-outcomes assessment is key to its effectiveness. The use of qualitative measures and creative thinking about assessment coordinates with what faculty believe is integral to the process.

By Clark Lemons
Learning is complete when it is embodied and finds expression in some public way within and for the community. The performing arts offer a strong means of achieving this.

My View

By John Ramsay
Honor as a value is learned through an experience in which public trust was violated. The incident leads to a lifetime of reflection on the ethical component of education.

Previous Issues